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Commentaries

Book One of JOJOVELLER contains an exhaustive guide of all the Stands featured at the time of the artbook's publication. Each page is dedicated to one particular Stand, containing a short commentary[1] from Hirohiko Araki about the inspiration(s) he's had for the Stand or for its user.

Each page also includes a picture of the Stand, basic information about it such as its user and its statistics, and a description of its powers as well as its feats.

Stardust Crusaders

It's the main character's Stand, so I made it a simple, combat-oriented type. It's designed to look like a guardian spirit. The shoulder pads look like Fist of the North Star? The spiral patterns symbolize the Ripple and the concept of infinity.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 8

I gave it a bird-like head, modeled after a phoenix, so the heroes' silhouettes wouldn't look too similar to one another when they're side by side. It's a pretty simple ability, right? The design might be influenced by Enki Bilal's characters.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 12

It's the Stand of the previous part's main character, so I wanted a departure from the humanoid appearance. Ultimately, it got more scenes to show off, but I was trying to make a Stand that wasn't very combat-oriented.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 18

I wanted some color balance between the allies and enemies, so he ended up green. And, Jotaro mentions this too, but green kinda reminds you of melons (laughs). At that time, I was really into green, and a lot of my illustrations were also heavy on the greens!

—Hirohiko Araki JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 14

I started with some of the less popular tarots for the enemies. The idea came from how annoying it would be if a bug got inside an airplane. But, the meaning of this card is a pretty scary one.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 22

Star Platinum looked like a human, so I made this one European armor plus robot. Contrasting punches with a sword! Both Polnareff and Chariot are fun characters to draw. They're classic-style, and highly mobile.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 16

I just had the simple idea that it would be easy to have a fight against a fish-man in the water. I imagined Stands to be a combination of the inorganic with life energy, so a lot of them appear to be a fusion of living creatures with machines.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 24

It's a ghost ship. Also, I might have been thinking about the tale of the Mary Celeste, which was found adrift and unmanned. I might have made its host a monkey due to influence from the movie Link.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 26

The idea came from Chucky in Child's Play, among other horror movies. The design of the doll is based off an African shaman. I went with a distinctive, primal design.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 28

At first, many of my ideas for enemy Stands came from horror items. You have a fish-man, a mummy, a cursed doll, and so on (laughs). And, this is another one in the horror items series. It's a slime.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 30

A gun Stand to fight against a sword. I thought it would be novel to have the gun instantly appear in his hand, instead of being drawn from a holster. Its appearance combines the designs of a revolver and an automatic pistol.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 34

Wouldn't it be scary if the reflection in a mirror moved differently from the original person (laughs)? As for the design, it's a mummified man. I added some mechanical elements so it doesn't seem biological.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 32

Our typical horror item, the human-faced tumor. The design is a modified form of an Indian Buddha statue. In JoJo, you don't need to keep inflating the enemies' strength, so it's easy to add some irregular enemies.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 36

You've got a car coming after you, like in Duel or Christine. The Design is a 60's-70's American car remodeled to look like an animal. The Stand's master exists only to make a joke.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 38

A scary natural phenomenon of the desert, bringing down a verdict of death. It's a great Stand, because you just draw a skull, add some holes, and you're done! Fundamentally, I start drawing without thinking about how the enemies will get defeated, so there's a lot of times where I'm in some trouble because I make them too strong (laughs).

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 40

His isn't a tournament fight, so you can have a weak, tiny enemy right after a huge, powerful enemy. I'd say its appearance is something like the robot from Short Circuit, crossed with a tick or a fly.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 42

When you have a Stand representing the sun, I think this is really the only option (laughs). I depicted him as a really strong enemy to make you think the fight's going to drag on for several weeks, but it's all a feint and he gets killed off right away.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 44

One way to make a story interesting is the mystery behind trying to find who the enemy is. So, here we have a world within a baby's dream. The Stand's design uses a Venetian carnival mask.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 46

The design was influenced by Mr. Shotaro Ishinomori's Kamen Rider and Kikaider. Of course, its ability was based off of the story of Aladdin and the Magic Lamp.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 48

This one has a motif of an African shaman's traditional dress. It looks like it's wearing a straw raincoat or something. The host is a woman, but I didn't make her very feminine so it would be more unexpected.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 50

I wanted to add a pet to the team at some point. Whites and blacks are easy to depict in manga, so that's how I chose his breed. The design is a fusion of dog and car. And, because it's sand(man), I added some Native American elements.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 20

I heard about someone drowning from a cup of water in a wash basin, and thought it would be cool to have someone drown in a desert. N'Doul was based off of Zatoichi. In my mind, Zatoichi is just a scary guy, rather than the hero.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 52

Up until this point, I had only been thinking about various ways to attack, like with fire or water, and it was around this point that I wanted to bring in an ability that could add some suspense to the story.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 54

I thought I could create an cool story by making an enemy with precognitive powers. This was around the time I got married. Not that I have precognition, but I was thinking about my own future while I was drawing this Stand.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 56

When I was drawing the Egypt 9 Glory Gods' Stands, I placed more importance on the story and tricks than the designs. For instance, you have people getting possessed and allies getting mind controlled.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 58

I do wonder what would happen a person became a magnet. It was around this time that I was writing about Nikola Tesla in the manuscript to The Lives of Eccentrics, and I was pretty interested in electromagnetism at that time.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 60

I've turned people into magnets and into kids. Its design comes from the Nazca lines and the opening to the anime Tetsujin 28-go. Seeing that shadow stretch across skyscrapers left a deep impression me.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 62

I wanted to draw a showdown between cheaters. It's a tradition from my first work, Poker Under Arms (laughs). The Stand's visuals are another fusion of an African-style design with mecha elements.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 64

This one's kinda creepy, looking like just a regular bird skeleton. He's Iggy's enemy in a battle between animals. As you'd expect, an enemy that attacks from the air is pretty strong.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 66

Modeled after a military robot. The cool part is how it looks like it's half man and half puppet. It was at this point that I started adding hearts to my designs, which eventually ties into Josuke's Stand.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 68

A Stand I put in to add some resting time to the story. I really like Kenny G's sax music, so I'm sorry to him for making him a disposable mook.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 76

A Stand where you eat yourself... I was thinking about nothingness and infinity. The design comes from the god of death and executioners. Like, the guys that decapitated people in medieval France.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 70

This is the Stand I designed first, as a boss, to contrast with Star Platinum's color and other traits. By countering Star Platinum's super speed with time stop, we get a battle between two characters with similar abilities.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 72

Diamond Is Unbreakable

A Stand that has the ultimate kindness. Star Platinum is kind of blackish, so I gave this one a contrasting color scheme. Josuke has an out-of-date appearance, but he keeps it that way on purpose.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 80

I imagined a deviant lurking in the town. This one's another slime-type. The Stand's design comes from ritual dolls and Jomon-era clay figures. I researched various sources to make it.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 110

It's really strong, with no limit to its powers. If Okuyasu were smart, he'd be unstoppable (laughs). He's impulsive and only sees what's right in front of him, so there are blinkers like you see on a racehorse to block the sides of its eyes and give it a narrow range of vision.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 88

I think the idea for this came from G.I. Joe action figures and the like. Anyway, I wanted to make a Stand unlike any other I'd done before. So, this Stand is an entire army that emerges from a single soul.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 112

A suspense story where you're trapped by a psychological attack, in Stand form. This extortion ability puts a lock on your heart. I gradually shrunk the host down so it would be easier to have him interact with Koichi.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 92

ACT1:

At first, I made it look like an alien larva. Then, it would gradually grow to adulthood. Anyway, I wanted to draw Koichi's growth, so I designed it knowing it would change forms.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 84

ACT2:

In its second stage, it's grown from a larva to a child. It's hands and feet are like... a raccoon, right? A standing raccoon.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 86

ACT3:

It's got its own personality, so it's like a friend... It's the image of Koichi made into a Stand. I thought, if you can turn sound into a physical object, you can do that with gravity, too.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 87

Did I ever have one of these dolls on hand? If anything, I was more interested in drawing how tricky its host was. Judging by the screw on its forehead, it might have been based off of the copy robot in Perman.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 94

A horror that's close to you in your daily life. Like Misery, maybe? In shojo comics in the 80s, girls were objects to be longed for, but from the 90s on, there were more stories with strong girls in lead roles.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 96

It's a cooking Stand, so I gave it a somewhat crazy appearance based off of tomatoes and Italian vegetables. The idea was, how can I create suspense using cooking as the theme?

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 98

When I saw the dinosaur with a strong headbutt from Kyoryu Daikiko, I thought, I like this guy! Also, the way he's strong despite being small might have been influenced by Frieza from Dragonball.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 114

I made this one to draw a story about Joseph and Josuke, and that's all there is to this Stand. It's a Stand that turns things invisible, so is its physical form invisible as well, or does it just not have one?

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 100

It's an ability that turns people into books, so I figured it didn't need a physical form of its own. For the characters that appear in Part 4, I tried to depict only their interactions with Josuke, without clearly defining whether they were allies or enemies, good or evil.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 90

An idea I came up with because I wanted to draw the suspense of hunting rats. I just wanted to make it look like a tool. It's a bit of a fusion between a retro cannon and bones, to give it a creepy feeling.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 116

Its design is a worker bee. If you look at its back, there's an abdomen. You've had those times when you're collecting coupons, and you wish you had just one more, right? I combined that with the image of bees collecting honey.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 102

A cat and a skull... It's a simple design, but I really like it. The design of the gloves and belt are nice, too. When you consider a bomb-based ability, you can do just about anything, so it was tough to work with.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 130

Around this time, everyone was talking about beauty shops and cosmetic surgery, so I thought I'd add an aesthetician. The appearance is a feminine silhouette plus beauty shop tools or a dentist's.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 104

Based off of Killer Queen's face, while giving off an aura like nothing in the world can break it... so, it's a tank. The dagger on its forehead represents an assassin, maybe?

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 133

The Stand's name comes from the Pink Floyd album Atom Heart Mother. The idea came to me because I thought it would be cool to have a cursed or haunted photo as a Stand.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 126

I envisioned a guardian spirit protecting a young boy. The design might have come from the robots from Mr. Mitsuteru Yokoyama's manga or something like that. That's why it's got the rows of rivets and the mask over its mouth, and stuff.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 118

I wanted to draw the character of Mikitaka Hazekura. He's a self-styled "space alien", but it's a mystery whether he's that, or a Stand user! Within the worldview of Jojo, aliens are just barely acceptable.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 108

A tracking Stand. The way it splits up like a daruma otoshi toy leaves an impression on you, doesn't it? Did I have a thing for net patterns back then? It looks like a 3-D object, even though it's a flat image!

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 106

When I was a kid, my grandpa had a cat named Chako. We doted on it, but I rememeber once it hurt me when I ignored it... I've never trusted cats ever since (laughs).

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 128

When I was a kid, there were these, well, free spirits around. They would live in caves, turn abandoned cars into their personal homes, and stuff. For a moment, that sort of survival lifestyle might seem fun (laughs).

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 120

The effects that appear when things turn flat is based off of M. C. Escher's art. Drawing his attacks was tough... I had to make sure the drawings joined up with each other just right.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 124

The motif is a piggyback monster. That, plus a touch of horror where you can't turn around. It's more of a supernatural creature than a Stand. Its host is just a pitiable man...

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 122

I didn't want to make a Stand that could do anything, so by splitting its abilities up like this, I added a limitation of sorts.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 134

Vento Aureo

I had the concept of the Egyptian symbol of life, the scarab, and the ladybug is also a beetle. Then, I needed a symbol of peace... so, angel wings or something? It has a slender silhouette, to go along with its host.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 138

The Rolling Stones album Sticky Fingers had a zipper on it. So, I thought it would be cool to have a zipper Stand, and made this one.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 144

Venetian carnival dress... like something out of Casanova? That, combined with the image of a god of death. It has a wide-brimmed hat and collar because it's wearing medieval Italian clothing.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 160

Is that a leotard, or full-body tights? Either way, it's covered in vinyl from head to toe. I saw this sort of fashion in a movie or something. It has an unorthodox ability, so it's not suited for combat.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 148

The design uses dots to differentiate itself from Kraft Work's lines. Because it stabs things with its saber and deflates them. I think I put more focus on the Stand users themselves rather than their Stands in Part 5.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 162

They got their name because it sounds like "Six Pistols." Six bullets... They each have slightly different faces, and drawing them got a little complicated. I might not remember them too clearly anymore (laughs).

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 146

I try not to give similar silhouettes to Stands that appear together. On another note, now that I look back on it, I might have been obsessed with giving Stands gritted teeth around this time (laughs).

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 164

Considering the balance of the team, I wanted a type of Stand that could fly around in combat. A simple ability is better for main characters. Aerosmith was a fun Stand to draw.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 150

I begin by thinking about the situation. Like, you have people turning flat, people turning small, that sequence of physical phenomena. As for the design, maybe this one was also influenced by Enki Bilal's characters?

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 166

This Stand has Roman armor and stitching to play up its weirdness. Its poison gas ability can do anything, but its host consciously restrains it. Fugo is actually a restrained individual.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 152

With inspiration from Michael Jackson's music, I thought it would be cool to go inside the mirror. This one also has a design based off a Venetian mask. Yes, some of them do have these tengu-like noses.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 168

A turtle is like a house on legs, right? Like, doesn't Gamera look like a spaceship? The pattern on the shell also looks like a jigsaw puzzle, and I had the idea of slotting a special, fancy-looking key in there.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 156

I was going to draw the lower half of its body, but then I thought, wouldn't it be fine without one? In the end, it came out with an unusual design that worked pretty well. The eyes all over its body are because I thought maybe there was a supernatural creature like that...

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 170

Pesci showed up because I wanted to depict a relationship between a leader and his underling. Like, "I've got what it really takes when push comes to shove!" For the ability, I thought it would be cool to fish on dry land. The reel is a skull to symbolize death.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 172

Its appearance is an evil version of Echoes ACT3... Like the image of a demonic boy. The modified mohawk makes it feel more dangerous. Melone's design was influenced by Venetian masks.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 174

This one was also made with a focus on the situation. I thought it would look cool to have a drawing where a guy skates down a road. I gave the host glasses so his face would leave an impression when you caught glimpses of it through his suit.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 176

It was shocking how, in the movie Total Recall, there was a guy with an extra face on his belly, with its own personality... For Diavolo, I thought he would look punk if his hair had a leopard pattern.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 190

I first thought of an ability that would force you to tell only lies, and then came up with the octopus's suckers design to let it stick to tongues. I also had the image of an alien larva in mind.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 180

Teleporting from one material to another... It was Venice, so I gave it water as a medium. I had the idea that it would be cool to have a shark inside a puddle of water. The design is an ancient, armor-plated fish.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 182

I was thinking it was about time for me to make Trish a Stand user. The design is based of a cat, and I also added arithmetic symbols because I thought it would look cool. Because Trish is a girl, I was careful to give it a soft silhouette.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 154

I made this Stand so Trish would have something to fight. If anything, I might have just wanted to draw the Stand's peculiar-looking host back then. Well, he died right away, though (laughs).

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 184

It's an ability that steals iron from your body... so it's modeled off cells or red blood cells, maybe? And also the Hattifatteners from the Moomins. I discussed whether it would be possible to make a nail out of the iron in a human body.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 178

Was Cioccolata influenced by the current events of the time? People were talking about quack doctors and people who enjoyed murder back then. I like the design where it disperses mold from its head.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 186

Much like the idea of skating across the ground, this one swims through the ground. The Stand covers the body like a wetsuit, and the surface is covered with scales so it can move through the ground more easily.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 188

Mozart began writing his Requiem when he got a commission from a mysterious visitor. Here, we have a pitch-black messenger, creating an image of death. The visitor's gender remains a mystery, so I gave the Stand an androgynous fashion.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 158

Just an evolved version of Gold Experience's design. It retains some points from the original design, while also bearing the arrow. Also, it's kinda like a flower that's grown up and bloomed... so maybe that's why its head is opened up too (laughs).

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 142

The story of Michaelangelo influenced me. He didn't plan out his sculptures as he carved, he saw a figure that was already inside the rock. It was nice how the story ended on a trailing note, wasn't it?

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 194

Stone Ocean

There's more focus on how Jolyne has to tear her body apart to fight than on the design. For its fashions, I tried to keep it from looking like any previous Stand. I like the python-patterned shoulder pads!

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 200

Kind of looks like Pocoloco's Stand from Part 7, doen't it? Like, it's someone you can make small talk with when you're lonely. I think its design is a mummified monkey. I really like the hairband that its host, Guess, wears.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 214

I heard about a child being born in a women's prison, and thought I maybe I'd be able to do a story about that. I believe that in this year, the Chicago Cubs won a regional game, which is why Emporio is a baseball kid.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 212

Designed to look like a sort of plant. There's a plant that looks like this and flies around. It grows in the tropics, so it's pretty large and fluffy. Then, I modified it to seem more like a satellite or stealth fighter.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 216

The symbols representing the bases in DNA, and my image of an executioner. Digital media had become standard, so it extracts large amounts of information as disks. I really like its design, and Pucci's as well.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 244

Sticks Kiss's stickers onto things... That's all (laughs). Again, I was careful not to make the Stand's silhouette too similar to those of her allies. Ermes's position in the story is kinda like a female version of Polnareff.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 204

I needed to lift someone up to make them commit suicide, and I thought it would be cooler to use propellers than rope. Characters in JoJo are generally optimistic, but this guy's optimistic about attempting suicide (laughs).

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 218

It looks more like a mutant or a space alien than a microscopic organism. That design might be an alternate version of Hierophant Green? I just tried to draw something insectoid or reptilian. It looks like a chameleon.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 206

It wears a welding mask. It's a creepy debt collector, so I hid its facial expressions. Miraschon's hairstyle is nice, too, isn't it? I thought it would be creepy to have someone spying on others through their hair.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 220

It's a Stand that controls the weather, so I made it look like clouds. I wanted to make frogs and all sorts of other stuff fall from the sky, maybe like a beastmaster. Its host wears a buffalo hat.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 210

As the name suggests, this Stand ignores gravity and hops around. I think I came up with this one after hearing the song, too. It wasn't really necessary to make it remotely controlled, so it became like a suit partway through.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 222

I thought the effects in the movie Hollow Man were cool. When the guy turns invisible, you can see his innards. I wanted to draw people in that sort of unfamilar form.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 224

This is another Stand where the situation came first... This stand can dive in and swim through all sorts of stuff. Kind of like Oasis, right? Aesthetically, it has diving equipment so it resembles a diver.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 208

It crawls along the ground like a jellyfish, and approaches you without being detected. Maybe it's because I was writing a prison story, but there's a lot of Stands in Part 6 that attack you psychologically, like ones that make you dream or ones that control your mind.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 228

At this point, multiple Stands show up at the same time, so there's a strong mystery element. Its host is just a walking lump of muscle. For the Stand, I thought it would be weird if meteors fell from the sky. That's all.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 226

This Stand is ultimately neutral, and always speaks the truth. Feng shui was a big thing at the time I was writing this. You'd see it on TV and stuff. As for myself, I'm only superstitious at most. I don't believe in feng shui.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 230

The essence of horror, where you think, I can't look away! is the main idea behind this Stand. Its design comes from the forest fairies that appear in Grimm's fairy tales.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 232

Its host was designed to be a demonic baby. The idea for its ability came from the physical paradox of infinity. I think the design came from a tribal thing, like The Fool and Sandman's Stand.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 242

Memories were a common theme in entertainment at the time, and this Stand went with the trend. It has a humanoid design that emphasizes the brain, and since it doesn't fight in melee combat, so I guess that's why it doesn't have hands to punch with.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 234

All the characters that appear are non-copyrighted. I actually wanted to draw a certain famous character, but the editing department rejected it... So I only put in the tail (laughs).

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 236

Based off the skyfish, an animal from an urban legend. They're also known as rods. I remember seeing a TV show about these back then, too, so that must be where they're from.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 238

The social issues of the time, or maybe a new type of fear. At the time, I was obsessed with psychological matters. I really like how its design has the things shooting out of its eyes.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 240

The advanced form of Whitesnake, right? He looks a little threatening now. Kinda like Darth Maul from Star Wars?

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 247

A centaur, right? But, it has two legs. It's a mythical creature, but it also includes mechanical elements. It accelerates time, so there are clocks all over its body.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 248

Steel Ball Run

A Stand that only gives Pocoloco more courage, right? It doesn't really do anything. It doesn't make you lucky, but it can help you feel more optimistic.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 266

Their abilities are nearly the same, but each Stand has a slightly different physical form. The Stands' design comes from the giant anteater, I think. I like how the eyes pop out on this one, too.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 272

When you think of cowboys, you gotta have lassos. I made that sort of association directly into a Stand. Mountain Tim is one of my favorite characters, even compared to the rest of Part 7.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 264

ACT1:

Something like a mascot character... designed with an axolotl in mind. I knew I was going to make it grow, but I haven't really drawn these sorts of cute and fluffy Stands a lot, so it was refreshing to draw.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 252

ACT2:

Now that ACT1 has grown a little, I added some elements to make it unclear whether it's animal or machine, like a traditional Stand.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 254

ACT3:

It's grown even more and become even more humanoid. But, its head is still embedded into its body, and its silhouette still isn't fully humanoid.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 255

ACT4:

The inside of its curtain-like body is hollow, and its face can move around like the Zaku's mono-eye. Up until 3, it hid behind its host, but this one is battle-ready.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 256

I think I probably got the idea for this Stand's design from a native African artwork. The netting over its hosts face acts as sunscreen or insect repellent. It's a piece of knowledge he used to participate in the race.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 274

From somewhere in the distance, it launches with infinite range and hoists you up. If it's going to appear from thin air and hoist someone up, I thought it would leave an impact to have winches shooting out of drifting feathers.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 276

Simply inspired by Jurassic Park... maybe? Like, you have tricky dinosaurs hunting in packs and all that. It becomes Dio's Stand, so I thought it fit his image too.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 270

A Stand that sprays stuff out to let you transform and stuff, that's all (laughs). And when you have a spray, you think of shaving cream, so I made it a sprays stuff like "fshhh".

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 262

Reverting just six seconds of time... Surprisingly hard to notice, huh? Its design is the sort of Stand that's worn over your body. It looks like the Major League Training Brace*, and I might have been thinking about tube-shaped implements with its design

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 278

The idea of walking on the rain comes from Catch the Rainbow, by Rainbow. That's why there's a rainbow on the mask. Its appearance is a rainbow version of a hockey mask.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 280

The design comes from Native American wall art and paintings. There are roses on its chest because I thought the mismatch would be cool. I like how its host looks with his long bangs and braids!

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 268

When you think about this Stand's concept, it must be that the great tree is the Stand user, and all the phenomena that occur around it are its Stand ability. It has a succession of watchers, and each one of them is named Sugar Mountain.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 282

The 11 men are Stand users, and they are all possessed by a single Stand. Maybe it's Tattoo 1, Tattoo 2, and so on? I think the appearance comes from a tattoo I once saw somewhere.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 284

A Stand without a physical form. This Stand ability makes objects into something like balloons. Just as it seems, the idea for this came from balloon art. Its host is a black man with sweet tattoos!

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 286

A full-body type Stand. Maybe the concept was an impenetrable defense? The idea is the belts stretch out like earthing wires, and redirect all the energy from enemy attacks into the ground.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 288

A Stand where its ability was the main idea. For the design, I think I focused on letting its head have an impact. It feels like a distorted metal mask. I feel like I was picturing plants for the legs... They end in roots.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 290

I wanted a silhouette unlike any previous boss, so I made its ears pointed. I designed it after the image of leather being stitched together, like on a baseball. I like how that stitching looks.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 294

There was that submarine game, right? The coordinate grid came from that. The words "chocolate disco" keeps getting repeated in the song Chocolate Disco, so the host doesn't speak any more than necessary, either.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 292

A Stand that Lucy temporarily gained from the power of the corpse. They say that tears are a woman's weapon, so the tears themselves turn into blades... I guess that's all there is to it (laughs).

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 297

The evolved form of D4C, crossing dimensions. The president is the boss because I saw Independence Day, where the president goes out to fight in person, and I thought that was cool.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 296

A visualization of the energy of Gyro's steel balls, breaking through dimensions. The art of the steel balls also ultimately turns into a Stand ability. I made this Stand appear to explain that.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 258

JoJolion

The design was created to match up with Josuke's outfit, rather than its ability. Maybe I imagined a sailor's uniform combined with the floatation devices in a lifevest. Its ears have grown a bit longer since it first appeared.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 302

It's got the image of a stethoscope. It can listen in to figure out what's happening on the floor below it. And, its head is a lemon juicer... Well, there's that thing that's shaped like a spaceship. Its host is a surfer, so he wears a wetsuit.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 306

A GPS Stand that shows you the way. The idea started with those bad GPSs... Like, you've had those times when your car's GPS keeps giving you the wrong directions, right? The fear of opening things was the theme for the chapter where this one first shows up.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 312

For story reasons, I wanted to make it clear at first glance that it was definitely a Stand and not a human when its helmet came off. That's why I took away its neck and embedded its head into its torso, to give it unusual visuals.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 310

It's a girl's Stand, so I thought I'd make it cute and fluffy. It has a full set of 5 segments aside from its head. Those are its torso and 4 limbs.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Stand Guide page 308

Originally, I was going to give the ability to attach screws to something to Josuke. But, despite the development from when Joshu first has his eyes taken away....

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Mini EX.1

Put simply, it was an idea I thought of from a childlike state of mind. But an ability where you can't recognize faces and feel yourself chased into loneliness appealed to me.

—Hirohiko Araki, JOJOVELLER Mini EX.2

References

  1. JoJo's Colored Adventure Team - Stand Comments